30 April 2013

9 comments:

Yhadi Ruiz said...

For some of the campus's with less total acreage but had more small green area had higher retention rates. More of a selection of hang out spots. IDK just a thought

Nstraube said...

The methodology seems pretty sound but i wonder if the original study had ways of controlling for economic background etc. I have a feeling this may have more to do with retention rates. Also I think you r thought that the sample group needs to be larger is correct. Another thought or line of inquiry would be median age and/or percentage of commuter students.

Zach Haertl said...

first off nice presentation, its very clear. In the introduction you mentioned that green space tends to make people "Happy", is there a way to look at an experiential level of study on this space. Maybe how one actually uses the space. Also greenspace has a lot of other factors in as well, such as trees, bushes, and etc.. maybe there is a way that you could include a study of something like that? Otherwise well done!

Dan Kornaus said...

Interesting presentation. I agree that looking at other campuses around the country (and from varied economic backgrounds) might be helpful to draw a more definite conclusion. Can you get access to some of the sources listed in the articles that you found, to see their methodology and findings?

Tyler Johnson said...

Could you somehow analyze similar data on the cities where these campuses are located? I think the data would run parallel to each other i.e. Milwaukee being more dense city than Eau Claire, Campus as well.

Alex Coyne said...

Very thorough, It would be nice to see levels of activy linked to the greenspaces, although that is difficult to map it would be interesting. Another thing would be to have maybe just one graphic showing hardscape, for purposes of contrast.

travis nissen said...

Interesting topic. the Wisconsin-centric focuses the argument based on one predominant climate. The fall and spring are the seasons that provide the most opportunity for the use of these spaces. How do the universities provide space in winter? Also what is the make up of these spaces, are they primarily bluegrass fields, or are they wooded? At UWM, the spatial uses are limited by the topography as well as the hardscape that divides the green space. Could you represent that in your analysis?

Alex Buettner said...

Good thesis, makes for a compelling argument for not just UW schools but also for schools all over the US. Nice visuals they read very well. I would like to see a 3 dimensional analysis between retention rate, amount of green space, and total size of school and see how that plays role. It would also be interesting to see an analysis of schools where green space does not play a large role in the campus, for example urban campus, or schools in the southwest.

Justin Woods said...

awesome graphics, and alot of information, looks legible, strong arguement.