30 April 2013

Zach Haertl - Presentation

10 comments:

Nstraube said...

Ha! I appreciate the absurdity of this process and think it rightly corresponds to the absurdity of the Waldo books in general. I think some faux-intense documentation of the process, treating it as if it were of the utmost importance could amplify this sense of the absurd. Push the ridiculousness of it.

Ainsley McMaster said...

There is a lot of great analysis you're planning. It'd be interesting to see these analyses all layered on top of each other. I don't know if it would aid in the overall understanding of the investigation, but it would definitely express the aesthetically complex nature of a 'Where's Waldo' puzzle. It might help in understanding a shift in complexity as the book progresses - instead of seeing each analysis as a stand-alone component, you might garner an understanding of how one puzzle might play up the locations of the decoys while in another it might push the density levels.

AmandaKay said...

It would have been nice to see a depiction of the time it took you to find Waldo. 12 puzzles in each book, right? Perhaps you could create a graphic and overlap the two?

John Annis said...

Maybe beyond the scope, but what if your diagrams and analysis provided help for the forgetful.

What if you discovered, or were looking, for ways to to quickly find missing objects? Your research could provide framework for a step-by-step solution to finding one's missing keys or phone in a time of emergency.


It would be comical to find out if Waldo could help us in the real world some way.

Yhadi Ruiz said...

Something that would be interesting would be to have someone who hasnt been conditioned to test each book and time them. I think if your the one finding waldo your mind begins to become more conditioned and your times maybe come shortened as you progress. I guess just having random individuals find waldo in a random book for the first time wouldbe interesting.

Alex Coyne said...

First of all, i would like to thank you for ruining my childhood. Just kidding. I really enjoyed the mapping techniques you used. It would be interesting to to a comparison of your times with someone elses. maybe head to the elementary school across the street. But very interesting stuff. Another thing you could do is look at what his silhouette is doing.

Evan Crossman said...

To what Nick says, I think you should teeter on the refined absurdity of the whole concept, because it is really intriguing, and I imagine you are enjoying the process quite a bit!
Also introducing time as a variable in some way may make things more interesting.

travis nissen said...

I'm glad your exploring this concept, and finally creating a methodology to finding waldo. How does the difficulty grow through the course of book. can you tie the page number, to how hidden visible waldo is? can you see his entire body or just his face?

Alex Buettner said...

I really enjoyed this presentation. Especially the analysis of the decoy proximities. It was interesting to see the close relationship. I wonder if there is a way to take the average distance of a decoy to waldo, create a radius proximity and see if waldo falls within.

Justin Woods said...

very inclusive and meaingful, alot of information that is well presented. Interesting topic. Seems to be the right balance of text and image.